Thursday, March 19, 2020

James Bond films Essays

James Bond films Essays James Bond films Essay James Bond films Essay Essay Topic: Film James Bond is a simple secret agent based on the books by Ian Fleming that were first created in the early 1950s, but has become an international British legend and the most successful film franchise ever. In forty years, twenty films have been made starring five different actors, each film being as brilliant and unique as the previous one. The Bond formula has remained successful because of the large number of differences and similarities between each film as well as the many simple characteristics of the Bond franchise. The charm, wit and heroic figure of James Bond has for many years made men want to be Bond and women want to be with Bond. Over the forty years, James Bond has developed many trademarks which are due to the effects of music, action, special editing and of course the unique plot of each film thought up by Ian Fleming. The opening sequence of every Bond film starts off with Bond in a dinner suit walking across the screen with a point-of-view shot from the barrel of a gun. Bond then abruptly turns and shoots the person aiming the gun; blood pours down the screen, and then cuts to the next shot. Every time a person watches this sequence, they can immediately establish that it is a James Bond film not only due to the special editing, but also the music. Bond has a world famous theme tune which is another trademark. In both the credit scenes of Goldfinger and Goldeneye, the soundtrack is sung by women with very strong, powerful voices who are Tina Turner and Shirley Bassie. The title of the film is continuously mentioned in the song and onscreen, there are silhouettes of girls or reflections of them on gold. This effect helps the audience to establish the genre of the film. The way Bond is introduced into each film usually has an impact on the audience. In Goldeneye, the audience sees a man on a mission dressed in black, however they are denied the mans identity, therefore many questions are raised such as Who is that? and What is he doing? . Suspense builds when the man does a bungee jump and the audience wonders why and whether he will survive or not. During this sequence, sound effects also add to the tension with plenty of diagetic sounds such as his footsteps, the plane and the loud gate. As the bungee jump is performed, there is a long silent and dramatic pause that is then broken by the sound of a gunshot which turns out to be one of Bonds numerous gadgets to draw him safely towards the ground. These all give the effect of action, drama and mystery which thrill the audience because it is exactly what they expect from a Bond film. In other films, Bond does not always appear in the opening sequence, and for instance, other men, whose identities are denied, will appear during the action and then may get killed to mislead the audience to wonder whether that was Bond who just died. However in Goldfinger, Bond enters in a wetsuit underwater, in low key lighting with a seagull on his head as a disguise. This time the only mystery is what Bond is up to but the use of a seagull creates humour and cuts any tension there may be within the audience. The audience then simply has to watch as Bond typically plants a bomb in the building. Once he completes this task, he simply removes his wetsuit to reveal an immaculately dressed secret agent in a dinner suit. This is a typical image of James Bond tiny characteristics such as his sartorial elegance is exactly what makes him such a unique character. In the opening sequence of Goldeneye, the loud diagetic sound of a plane is heard from a helicopter shot of an enormous dam which cuts straight to the man on a mission. The helicopter shot achieves the image of one man against an immense monolithic adversary which emphasises Bonds heroic figure. It is also clear to see that James Bond is typically British with his unusual politeness as well as his accent and dialogue. For example, in Goldeneye, he sneaks up on an enemy in the toilets and just before he punches the man, Bond says, Beg your pardon, forgot to knock. It is his iconic Englishness that also makes Bond a unique and memorable secret agent. James Bond is admired by women for his good looks and charms; however he does not always appear to be the perfect gentleman. Bond easily knows how to seduce a woman, by simply using his charms, although the audience does notice how quickly his behaviour changes in different situations. In Goldfinger, he is seen with three different women in the first few scenes alone. After seducing each one, he first uses one woman as a shield against an attacking enemy, and then later dismisses a woman in a rude and sexist manner. He appears to be charming but is remorselessly brutal when he needs to be. The way Bond quickly seduces different women, but never thinks about a more long-term partner emphasises the idea of working alone. James Bond is always working by himself never as part of a team and this also adds to his brave and heroic figure. There is always a villain in every Bond film, usually just as brutal as Bond and will do anything to defeat him. In Goldeneye the smartly dressed villain enters with an army of men aiming guns at Bond. When one of the men try to shoot Bond after being ordered not to, he is immediately shot by the villain. Similarly to Bond, the villain is brutal and feels no remorse for his actions. It seems the villain can never be any real threat towards Bond because all James Bond films have become predictable to a certain extent and the audience knows that the chances of Bond being killed are almost impossible. It is the special features of every Bond film such as the character of Bond, girls, villains, cars, gadgets, his iconic Englishness and of course the plot, which is what makes the Bond formula so successful. The James Bond franchise is so successful that spoofs have been created to try and match its fame, such as Austin Powers, but of course these could never match the success achieved by Bond.

Monday, March 2, 2020

Every Company Is a Publishing Company

Every Company Is a Publishing Company Every Company Is a Publishing Company Every Company Is a Publishing Company By Mark Nichol A recent Wall Street Journal article that beamed a spotlight on sophomoric speaking and grammar gaffes in the workplace covered the issue fairly thoroughly but left unsaid some pertinent points. The article discussed the epidemic of informality in critical corporate settings such as staff meetings and in-person communication with clients: What do you do when employees seem ignorant of expectations for adopting the appropriate linguistic register in these contexts, using chatting vernacular (â€Å"You guys, like, cut it out!†) when a moderate degree of formality (â€Å"Please, let’s just have one person talk at a time†) or even a sober formality (â€Å"I wish to remind you to raise your hand if you wish to be called on to comment†) may be expected? It also discusses disturbingly colloquial correspondence, or that which is rife with typographical errors and poor grammar. The answer, for some companies, is to require employees to have one or more colleagues review letters and emails before they are sent out. Others hire consultants to train workers to become better writers. But both strategies have their weaknesses: Two or three heads are not necessarily better than one, especially if they are empty when it comes to writing skills. And writing workshops can only accomplish so much unless they are intensive and extensive and expensive. A combination of these approaches is best but still won’t produce flawless results, and many businesses are not willing or able to invest in the effort. Is this issue such a big deal? It depends on who you ask. This word nerd says, â€Å"Hell, yeah!† (or, depending on the pertinent linguistic register, â€Å"Indubitably.†). What does every enterprise have in common, besides selling a product, a service, or an idea? The answer: communication. All businesses must connect with current and prospective customers or clients, and partners, through transmission of language (usually at least primarily written language). Even if the only text the recipient sees is a business card, an invoice, or an email, the company’s reputation is on the line on every line. What’s the ideal solution? Every business publishes information (and, believe it or not, clients and customers notice poor and careless writing, even if they don’t recognize specific errors). So, treat your business like a publishing company, and institute an editorial process. At my last job before I began the current freelancing phase of my editing and writing career, I was responsible for the presentation of all content on the website of a prestigious educational foundation. Therefore, I considered it of paramount importance that the content be of outstanding quality. In addition to editing the journalistic content, I insisted on editing all marketing and advertising copy, I vetted job postings, I even pored through the site’s terms of use. Eventually, this comprehensive quality control became onerous and I delegated some responsibilities, but visitors had to work hard to find errors on that site. If you work at a sizeable company and you have responsibility for or are otherwise involved in the generation of business-to-business, business-to-client/customer, or even internal content, I urge you to consider or recommend designating the resident grammar geek, or a hiring a staff or contract editor, to serve as the conduit for at least the most significant communications or correspondence. Of course, only the smallest enterprises can monitor all messaging, and even then, requiring inspection of all email messages seems repressive. But the solution discussed above, perhaps combined with workshops and one-on-one consultation conducted by the designated editor, will have a significant positive impact on the quality of your company’s communications. Want to improve your English in five minutes a day? Get a subscription and start receiving our writing tips and exercises daily! Keep learning! Browse the Business Writing category, check our popular posts, or choose a related post below:Types of RhymeOne Sheep, Two Sheep, One Fish, Two Fish . . .While vs. Whilst

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Violent crime and Insurgency Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Violent crime and Insurgency - Essay Example In contrast to that, a common criminal is one who looks for opportunistic target, lacks discipline and is selfish and can be discouraged comparatively easily. Generally, terrorists are well trained as compared to ordinary criminals. Due to the fact that terrorists are well trained, skilled and possess a specific goal in mind, the propensity of destruction and level of violence can be much higher than that which is created by criminals. Terrorists are so much determined to their cause that they don’t get afraid of putting even their own life in danger (Goldstein, 2007). Another important differentiation between criminals and terrorists is that when they are caught doing some illegal act, criminals usually escape from the criminal zone and take shelters in order to hide from police whereas terrorist usually call upon huge media propaganda and take credits of their acts. Another criteria which provides differentiation between terrorism and criminals violence is the frequency and span of attacks. Criminals usually operate within the span of their hide outs whereas terrorists operate within the boundary of an entire country. Many terrorists also operate internationally in geographic regions (White, 2006). Insurgency is often called as political effort or movement established for a specific aim. This sets it apart from terrorism where individuals establish goals and do every possible effort to achieve them. Another major difference between insurgency and terrorism is the intent of activities and operations. The ultimate objective of insurgency is to challenge the prevailing government through political concessions in order to share political power. Insurgency requires various kinds of supports including from external support, approval and recognition from other political parties etc. whereas a group of terrorist doesn’t require support from any side

Sunday, February 2, 2020

Current trends in the market from risk management prospective Essay

Current trends in the market from risk management prospective - Essay Example The Most Important Trends in Global Financial Crisis That Have Affected Financial Markets, Institutions and the Economy from 2007 To 2009 Important lessons that can be learnt from the recent global economic crisis are purely based on risk prepared and management practices capable of averting any financial challenge. A general reluctance to handle risk with caution can be translated by all facts to have been the cause of economic downturns observed from 2007. According to Hubbard (p6)1 reluctance to employ the best risk assessment techniques prevents the management from realizing how potent and hazardous a risk would be. The author therefore attributes failure to mitigate risk to wrong technique for measuring the risk and its gravity. To illustrate this position, the author finds fault with the manner in which top risk management firms and federal agencies conducted their risk assessment resulting in wrong approach to mitigate the risks. A cascade of ill-informed interventions could o nly worsen the case for the economic crisis that hit the financial markets for the better part of 2008 through 2009 and whose impact is still being felt to date. It is clear that the most important trend in the modern economic world entails risk assessment, which must be done right at all cases to avoid miscalculations resulting into multiplier disasters. House ownership was at the centre of interest for the financial markets, having been established in the USA to such low risk levels that the major global financial players willingly ventured in it. As Fraser and Simkins (p272)2 observe, a high demand for housing attracted high prices and supply was fast catching up to share in the benefits. The Federal Reserve was allowing the lowest interest rates for the first time in the history of the market. The homeowner society of Japan which has been prone to stagnation for long is being affected by economic crisis resulting from globalization. In most of the developed countries where capit al market is deregulated by neo-liberal policies, their financial institutions are facing great effects from the global financial markets. For instance for these countries to maintain their market for their goods they have to maintain strong relations with the particular countries which provide market for their goods. This may lead to a financial crisis in that the developing countries may end up accruing debts which may affect the market. Global financial crisis through the economic turns of the overseas countries have damaged the export-based macroeconomics of Japan ACCORDING TO Forrest and Yip (p199). As the global financial crisis around the world has affected the economy and thus has brought about significant drops in stock markets. The downfall of the United States sub-marine mortgage market followed by the reversed housing boom of the industrialized countries economy has had a diverse effect around the globe. The sub-marine crisis resulted from financial assets such as securi ty assets which involved banks transferring their loans into purchasable assets. This results to banks off-loading loans which are risky onto other financial institutions. The crisis have also been on the increase because of the fact that banks are engaging in huge risks which in turn increase their exposure to financial problems. Collapsing banks suck funds from the economy in their

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Pouring Postmodernism into the Computer :: Internet Technology Essays

Pouring Postmodernism into the Computer "I can't define it, but I know it when I see it," has become a standard reply to questions that are hard to answer, now serving as the definition of more than just pornography. Postmodernism seems to at times share this elusive definition. To paraphrase Lyotard, its refusal to take solace in and unified form and conventions are partly responsible for its apparently shapeless definition. Paraphrasing Sherry Turkle, computer culture realizes postmodern concepts, especially a realization of those concepts pertaining to the nature of the self (17-19). For Turkle and others, partaking in chat rooms, creating identities on the computer, and the structure of computer software itself all concretize a previously abstract set of postmodern concepts. Before summarizing segments of Turkle's Identity in the Age of the Internet, a short background on postmodern concepts of the self is helpful. Postmodern thought rejects the idea of a deeper self that can be discovered by rationally peeling away surface layers of that self. The idea that truth can be found by this process, on a personal level or in a narrative structure, is a point of contention. As Stephen Frosh says in Social Experience and the Constructed Self, "More generally, postmodernism opposes all tendencies to take refuge in any illusion of wholeness or of received wisdom†¦" (277). Thus, enlightenment-age scientific approaches to uncover knowledge fall under the "illusion of wholeness and received wisdom." Instead, postmodernism perceives the world through a large network of interconnected but meaningless things and experiences (Frosh, 282). Frosh's opinion of self and action is also revealing: "†¦gone is the differentiation between the self and its expression†¦.Meaning does not precede these practices, but is enigmatically created by them†¦" (280). This is to say that in the writing of a book for example, meaning is produced by the text. The author ceases to be a sort of creator, with a preconceived plan. The book's meaning is transitory, as readers may have several different experiences with a book, regardless of the author's intentions. Finally comes the idea of the self as a social construct. To make sense of the world around us, some have suggested that the self is created in order to give a reference point for existence. Self-construction gives our lives meaning because it allows us to make sense of what surrounds us. I am me. That house across the street is not me, neither are the people who live in that house. Pouring Postmodernism into the Computer :: Internet Technology Essays Pouring Postmodernism into the Computer "I can't define it, but I know it when I see it," has become a standard reply to questions that are hard to answer, now serving as the definition of more than just pornography. Postmodernism seems to at times share this elusive definition. To paraphrase Lyotard, its refusal to take solace in and unified form and conventions are partly responsible for its apparently shapeless definition. Paraphrasing Sherry Turkle, computer culture realizes postmodern concepts, especially a realization of those concepts pertaining to the nature of the self (17-19). For Turkle and others, partaking in chat rooms, creating identities on the computer, and the structure of computer software itself all concretize a previously abstract set of postmodern concepts. Before summarizing segments of Turkle's Identity in the Age of the Internet, a short background on postmodern concepts of the self is helpful. Postmodern thought rejects the idea of a deeper self that can be discovered by rationally peeling away surface layers of that self. The idea that truth can be found by this process, on a personal level or in a narrative structure, is a point of contention. As Stephen Frosh says in Social Experience and the Constructed Self, "More generally, postmodernism opposes all tendencies to take refuge in any illusion of wholeness or of received wisdom†¦" (277). Thus, enlightenment-age scientific approaches to uncover knowledge fall under the "illusion of wholeness and received wisdom." Instead, postmodernism perceives the world through a large network of interconnected but meaningless things and experiences (Frosh, 282). Frosh's opinion of self and action is also revealing: "†¦gone is the differentiation between the self and its expression†¦.Meaning does not precede these practices, but is enigmatically created by them†¦" (280). This is to say that in the writing of a book for example, meaning is produced by the text. The author ceases to be a sort of creator, with a preconceived plan. The book's meaning is transitory, as readers may have several different experiences with a book, regardless of the author's intentions. Finally comes the idea of the self as a social construct. To make sense of the world around us, some have suggested that the self is created in order to give a reference point for existence. Self-construction gives our lives meaning because it allows us to make sense of what surrounds us. I am me. That house across the street is not me, neither are the people who live in that house.

Friday, January 17, 2020

The Speckled Band Essay

One character that is physically strong and commanding, also with some knowledge, is Dr. Grimesby Roylett, who appears in the story â€Å"The Speckled Band†. Unlike Irene Adler, he doesn’t outwit Sherlock Holmes in the end, but he does make life difficult for him to actually solve the case. For one, he has some strange pets that he keeps, and he is made out to be the bully. For another, he makes Holmes go to the extremes to solve the case. The characters that are introduced in these stories have different characteristics, and they all have different strengths and weaknesses, but deciding if they appeal to the modern day reader could be down to a matter of opinion. I think that if somebody who was interested in all the high-tech gadgets and latest technology would not find the characters in this very appealing and attention-grabbing, as they, especially Holmes, do not use any gadgets to do things or solve the case. Likewise, the characters may also not appeal to a modern audience because they would not be considered â€Å"cool† by the public. This may be the case, but I believe that a great deal of people would find these characters appealing; because of the way they do things. For example Sherlock Holmes would definitely be appealing because he doesn’t use any gadgets to solve his cases, he uses his brain power. London at the time of Sherlock Holmes was made out to be a rough, crime riddled place, where men where more superior than women. The description of London that is anticipated by the reader makes Sherlock Holmes stands out, as he is a successful person who doesn’t resort to crime; he fights against it. This was unlike any other detective in those days, as they were known to be unintelligent and ineffective with cases, most predominant being the police force. Detectives in the past didn’t have any technology to solve crime, so they had to rely on two main concepts: The brain power and the will power. In the time many considered that the police force were failing because they didn’t have either. Sherlock Holmes used both to solve his crimes, and he always prevailed, excluding â€Å"A Scandal in Bohemia†.  These factors may have an impact on today’s reader, because as people are becoming consumed with the usage of modern technology, I believe that many people would adore somebody who does not need such equipment; only his brain. In conclusion, to the question â€Å"Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories were written over a hundred years ago. They are antiquated and out dated and have nothing to offer a modern day reader.† I think that for some aspects of the story it is true, but for some aspects it isn’t true. The stereotypes that are used in the stories have changed as time has gone by so the same effect cannot be created, and also because of the lack of technology a modern day reader may not be interested. Despite of all this, many still believe, including myself, that the Sherlock Holmes stories can still be relevant to a modern day audience. The techniques that are really the foundations of the techniques that are used in today’s detective stories, arguably even better. One thing that many people ask to themselves is† would a modern Sherlock Holmes story be better than the original one?† My answer to that: No.

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

The Effects of Homelessness on Society Essay - 588 Words

Homelessness Ever noticed the people outside, asking you for money on the train or in the streets? Most have a funny smell, or are barely dressed when it is freezing outside? Those people are more than likely homeless. Being homeless is the state of a person living on the streets, if they have no home. Homelessness occurs because many people cannot afford housing, do not have a job, receive low income, are mentally ill or have a drug addiction (Coalition for the Homeless). Homelessness affects society in a variety of ways making it a social issue. It causes economic downturn, increases poverty, and also causes family dysfunction. Since January of 2002 the homelessness rate has increased 69 percent. There are more than 52,400 homeless†¦show more content†¦Some children who are developed enough feel neglected, they feel they are not well taken care of and often tend to run away from home. Unemployment and lack of education plays a major role in these individual homeless people’s lives. With unemployment and high school dropout rates rising, homelessness cannot be prevented. Kids are taught from a young age to stay in school because the ones that dropout around high school is more than likely to become homeless. High school dropouts are likely to become homeless because they are likely to get kicked out of their dysfunctional home, or possibly run away from home feeling as if they are not good enough for the family. Dropouts will find it difficult to preserve a job, most will turn to drugs, becoming an addict, only hoping that it will make things better, really just increasing the rate of poverty and homelessness. Most of these families and individuals now are in programs like Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, also known as welfare(National Coalition,2009), Medicaid and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. These programs provide cash, health care benefits and food for these families and most individuals helping the individuals or families to get back on their feet although some will get denied for such help. Homelessness will continue to be on a high-rise until the unemployment rate, high school dropout rate, and drug abuse rate decreases.Show MoreRelatedHomelessness And Its Effects On Society2302 Words   |  10 Pagesâ€Å"It’s time to declare a war on homelessness, which is evolving into a crisis,† proclaimed Mayor Kirk Caldwell in The Honolulu Star Advertiser. (Katel, 841-864) Homelessness has become a widely known issue in the United States. Many people today are living in the streets without a source of food, water, or a place to sleep at night. Some who are among the homeless include the elderly, children, and those who are mentally ill. This is a cause for concern for citizens who are living their daily livesRead MoreThe Emotional, Social, And Academic Effects Of Homelessness On Children1291 Words   |  6 Pages01/22/2015 The emotional, social, and academic effects of homelessness on children Hardly a day in life goes by without seeing a homeless child trying to survive, especially in developing countries. Unwanted sightings of homeless children happen every day both in developed and underdeveloped countries. The increase in divorce and trend in cohabitation has led to an increasing number of children being homeless. As stated in the â€Å" Homeless Facts Children and Homelessness - Some Facts conducted by the CommitteeRead MoreHomeless in The United States 1309 Words   |  6 PagesHomelessness is a problem that happens in many different countries around the world. Definitions of homelessness are defined in different meanings by different people. However, the Stewart B. 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Homelessness is influenced by drug and alcohol disuse, being homeless at a young age, money problems, and trauma symptomsRead MoreHomelessness in Canada Essay882 Words   |  4 PagesHomelessness is a condition of people who lack regular access to adequate housing. As this condition becomes a growing problem in Canada people are forced to deal with the issues. Who are the homeless? They range from children to adults and even in some cases, families. Why are they homeless? Poverty, lack of jobs or well paying jobs, declin e in Social Services, domestic violence, mental illness, and chemical dependency contribute to the majority of the homeless within our society. What effects doesRead MoreThe Outcasts Of Society, The Lazy And Incompetent, Or The Victims Of Extreme Misfortunes?1607 Words   |  7 PagesThe outcasts of society, the lazy and incompetent, or the victims of extreme misfortunes? 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Homelessness gained public attention in the late 1970s because homelessness became more visible when it began to include women and children. Today homelessness can be linked to various other problems. It is estimated that 200,000 thousand Canadians have lived in or used the services of a homeless shelter. On any given night, as many as 30,000 thousand Canadians experience homelessness and as many as 50,000 thousand Canadians may be â€Å"hidden homelessness† victims. In other wordsRead MoreHomelessness in Sacramento1439 Words   |  6 Pageseach social class in society, those who fall in the underclass are referred to as the poor. They typically live in areas with high rates of poverty and few opportunities to improve their lives. But what about those who have less than the lower class. There is a rising population of people who have lost everything and therefore must take shelter in the local parks, abandoned buildings, overpasses, and any other form of protection against the elements (Schutt, 2011). Homelessness is a social problem